Your CMC Librarian

Kari Garman

Curriculum Materials Center Display
Cullom-Davis Library Renovations
Great Article Databases for Education
ERIC is a large database with content managed by the Department of Education.  It dates back to 1966 and contains lots of full text.  
The Professional Development Collection is a much smaller database with a tight focus on certain subjects in education with an abundance of full-text articles.  
 
Full-text journals in the humanities and social sciences.
Tumblebooks: Your Source for Online Storybooks
TumbleBooks Restricted Resource Some full text available
a collection of TumbleBooks (animated, talking picture books) TumblePuzzles, and TumbleQuizzes, as well as TumbleResources for teachers.
Note: a collection of TumbleBooks (animated, talking picture books) TumblePuzzles, and TumbleQuizzes, as well as TumbleResources for teachers.
FAQ
What is the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center?
 
The Howard M. and Kathryn Jacquin Simpson Curriculum Materials Center is a designated space housing a collection of resources aimed at K-12 students and their instructors.  We have books, testing kits, big books, sample textbooks, an Ellison die cut press system, and other items that educators may use.
 
Who can check out books and materials from the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center?
 
Any cardholder in good standing at the Cullom-Davis Library can check out books from the Curriculum Materials Center.  This includes faculty, staff, students, and guests who present a Bradley University ID or valid local library card. 
 
How do I check out materials from the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center?  How many may I check out at once? 
 
Items may be checked out upstairs in the Curriculum Materials Center if an attendant is present.  If no one is currently staffing the desk upstairs, items must be brought downstairs to the Circulation Desk on the main floor for checkout.  The maximum number of items any person may have on his / her card is 150.
 
How can I find items in the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center?
 
Check the library catalog for holdings.  If an item is listed with a location in the Curriculum Materials Center, Curriculum Materials Center Cabinets, or Curriculum Materials Center Workroom, it may be found on the second floor in the CMC area by call number.  Consult the ends of the bookcases in the CMC to see where various call numbers are located.  If an item is listed with a location of ‘Curriculum Materials Center Cabinets’ or ‘Curriculum Materials Center Workroom,’ ask at the CMC desk or, if that area is unstaffed, the main floor Circulation Desk for assistance.
 
I can’t find the item I’m seeking in the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center.  What should I do? 
 
Ask for assistance at the Curriculum Materials Center Desk or, if that area is unstaffed, at the main floor Circulation Desk.
 
What hours is the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center staffed?
 
Generally, the Curriculum Materials Center is staffed from noon – 10 pm Monday through Friday during the Fall and Spring semesters.  It is not staffed during breaks or over the summer.  If you require assistance for the Curriculum Materials Center outside of those hours, please come to the Circulation Desk on the main floor of the library.

Can I use the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center when no staff are present?
 
Yes, you may browse the collection and take items to the main floor Circulation Desk for checkout.  For assistance with testing kits or other items kept in locked areas, ask at the main floor Circulation Desk.
 
I’m a faculty member.  May I reserve the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center for a class?
 
Yes, you may.  Contact the Access Services / Education Librarian at 309-677-2848 to schedule this.
 
Is the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center a quiet study area? 
 
No, the Curriculum Materials Center is not designated as a quiet study area.  We do ask our patrons to speak in tones respectful to others working nearby.
 
Are there testing kits available for use or checkout in the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center?
 
Yes!  We have a variety of testing kits for different age levels and purposes.  Check our ‘Kits’ tab for a list of what’s available.  FACULTY MEMBERS may check out and remove kits from the building.  STUDENTS may use testing kits in-house.  Students may only check out kits if their instructor has pre-arranged for them to have special permission to check out a given kit.  For assistance in kit retrieval, ask at the Curriculum Materials Center desk on the second floor.
 
May I suggest an item for the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center collection?
 
Definitely!  You may give a suggestion to an attendant at the Curriculum Materials Center desk, slip a suggestion into the Suggestion Box on the counter on the main floor, or email the Access Services / Education Librarian at kgarman@bradley.edu.
 
May I use the Ellison die press machine?  What dies are available to use with the machine?
 
To use the Ellison machine, ask at the main floor Circulation Desk for staff assistance.  Click on the ‘Ellison Machine’ tab for a full list of the dies we own.  Please note that we do NOT provide paper; you must bring your own.
 
Is there a cost to use the Ellison die press machine?
 
There is no cost, but you must provide your own paper.
 
ETE 260 Genre Booklists

Searching for children's and YA books by genre for ETE 260?  Click on the titles of each category below for a starter list of books in each category!

Biography
Narrative of a person's life; a true story about a real person.

Contemporary Realistic Fiction
Story that can actually happen and is true to life.

Historical Fiction
Story with fictional characters and events in a historical setting.

Informational (aka non-fiction)
Nonfiction text dealing with an actual, real-life subject.

Modern Fantasy
Fiction with strange or otherworldly settings or characters; fiction that invites suspension of reality.

Traditional Literature
The songs, stories, myths, and proverbs of a people or "folk" as handed down by word of mouth.


Unicorn image source: https://pixabay.com/en/animal-creature-equine-fantasy-2023216/

Genre definitions from the California Department of Education at https://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/cr/rl/litrlgenres.asp 
Award Booklists

To see the books in the list, click the name of the list (in bold).

Asian Pacific American Award for Literature - Children's and Young Adult
This award honors and recognizes individual work created by an Asian Pacific American writer and / or illustrator and is based on literary and artistic merit.

Mildred L. Batchelder Award
This award honors Mildred L. Batchelder, a former executive director of the Association for Library Service to Children, and a believer in the importance of good books for children in translation from all parts of the world. Established in 1966, the award is a citation given to an American publisher for a children's book considered to be the most outstanding of those books originally published in a foreign language in a foreign country, and subsequently translated into English and published in the United States.

Pura Belpre Award
Established in 1996, The Pura Belpre Award honors Latino writers and illustrators whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in children's books.

Caldecott Medal
The Caldecott Medal was named in honor of nineteenth century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Services to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.

Rebecca Caudill Young Reader's Book Award
The Rebecca Caudill Young Reader's Book Award is an annual award named in honor of Rebecca Caudill, who lived and wrote in Urbana, IL for nearly 50 years.  It is given to the author of a book voted most outstanding by students in grades four through eight in participating Illinois schools.

Children's Africana Book Award
The Children's Africana Book Awards are presented annually to the authors and illustrators of the best children's and young adult books on Africa published or republished in the US.

Ezra Jack Keats Book Award
Known collectively as the Ezra Jack Keats Book Award, the New Writer Award was established in 1985 and the New Illustrator Award in 2001 to recognize and encourage emerging talent in the field of children's books.

Coretta Scott King Award
The CSK Award commemorates the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and honors his widow, Coretta Scott King, for her courage and determination in continuing the work for peace and world brotherhood. the award is presented annually to authors and illustrators of African descent whose distinguished books promote an understanding and appreciation of the "American Dream."

Newbery Medal
The Newbery Medal was named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.

Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature
Beginning in the year 2000, this award is given to a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature.

Tomas Rivera Mexican-American Children's Book Award
This award is given by the Southwest Texas State University School of Education to encourage authors, illustrators, and publishers to produce books that authentically reflect the lives of Mexican-American children and young adults in the US.

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award
This new award, established by the Association for Library Services to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), is for an author of the most distinguished informational book published during the preceding year.

Description of awards, with the exception of the Ezra Jack Keats, Rebecca Caudill, and CABA, from the Yankee Book Peddler Children's Book Awards Collection Plan. Description of Ezra Jack Keats Award from Ezra Jack Keats Foundation.  Description of CABA from Africa Access. Description of Rebecca Caudill from Rebecca Caudill Foundation.
Fabruary is Black History Month

The History of the Coretta Scott King Book Awards

 
The Coretta Scott King Book Awards are given annually to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.  The award commemorates the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and honors his wife, Mrs. Coretta Scott King, for her courage and determination to continue the work for peace and world brotherhood.  

The Awards are given in author and illustrator categories; honor recipients may also be named. Both the Author and Illustrator Winner recipients receive a plaque and $1,000. The John Steptoe Award for New Talent is occasionally given for  young authors or illustrators who demonstrate outstanding promise at the beginning of their careers. Steptoe winners receive a plaque.   

The Coretta Scott King - Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement is presented in even years to an African American author, illustrator or author/illustrator for a body of his or her published books for children and/or young adults, and who has made a significant and lasting literary contribution. In odd years, the award is presented to a practitioner for substantial contributions through active engagement with youth using award winning African American literature for children and/or young adults, via implementation of reading and reading related activities/programs. Virginia Hamilton Award recipients receive a medal and $1,500. 

History

The Coretta Scott King Book Award was founded in 1969 by Mabel McKissick and Glyndon Greer at the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Atlantic City, New Jersey.  The first award was given to Lillie Patterson in 1970 for her biography, Martin Luther King, Jr.: Man of Peace (Garrard). 

In 1979, the Coretta Scott King Task Force was formed and became part of ALA’s Social Responsibilities Round Table (SRRT) the next year.  In 1982, the Coretta Scott King Book Awards became an officially recognized ALA award.  The Coretta Scott King Task Force joined ALA’s Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Round Table (EMIERT) in 2003 and became the Coretta Scott Book Awards Committee. 

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards have grown to include several categories.  In 1974, George Ford became the first illustrator to receive the award for Ray Charles (Crowell).  The John Steptoe Award for New Talent (originally the Genesis Award) was established in 1995 to recognize exceptional work from new African American authors and illustrators.  The first Steptoe Award was given to Sharon Draper for Tears of a Tiger (Simon & Schuster).  In 2010, the committee established the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement to be given alternately to an author or illustrator and a practitioner.  The first Hamilton Award recipients were Walter Dean Myers (2010) and Henrietta M. Smith (2011). 

Since 1972, the recipients of the Coretta Scott King Book Awards have been honored at a celebratory breakfast during the ALA Annual Conference.  In 2009, ALA published the fourth edition of The Coretta Scott King Awards, a complete history of the awards edited by Henrietta M. Smith. 

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards Seal

CSK Winner seal image (watermarked)The Coretta Scott King Book Awards Seal was designed by artist Lev Mills in 1974.  The symbolism in the seal reflects both Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s philosophy and the ideals of the award.

The basic circle represents continuity in movement, resolving from one idea to another. Within the circle is the image of an African American child reading a book.  The five main religious symbols below the image of the child represent nonsectarianism. The superimposed pyramid symbolizes both strength and Atlanta University, the award’s headquarters when the seal was designed.  At the apex of the pyramid is the dove, symbolic of peace.  The rays shine toward peace and brotherhood.

The bronze seal denotes a Coretta Scott King Book Award author or illustrator winner; the silver denotes an author or illustrator honoree; and the green seal denotes a John Steptoe Award for New Talent recipient.

According to Lev Mills, the five nonsectarian* symbols on the seal represent:

Star and Crescent - a symbol of Islam. Many nations with a Muslim majority display this symbol on its flags. This not a religious symbol but rather it is a national, cultural, political, military, or community symbol.

Om - a symbol of Hinduism. The written form of the word is in Sanskrit, a language of India. The sound OM is used repeatedly during meditation.

Latin Cross - a symbol of Christianity; the cross upon which Jesus died; Christian emblem or badge.

Star of David - a hexagram used as a symbol of Judaism.

Tao - a symbol of China. Pronounced “Dow,” it has the design of “Yang and Yin” (Dualism); its purpose is to nourish balance in the universe.

"The History of the Coretta Scott King Book Awards", American Library Association, January 18, 2009.

http://www.ala.org/rt/emiert/cskbookawards/about (Accessed February 1, 2019)



Coretta Scott King Book Award List-Complete List

Immigration and Refugee display for January
Artist Megan E. Le
Aesop Prize Award-winners
Aesop Prize Seal









 

Looking for an outstanding book based on myth or folklore?  Check into these Aesop Prize-winners.  An award given by the American Folklore Society, the Aesop Prize "recognize[s] exceptional books, for children or young adults, that are based on folklore."

Aesop Prize Award-winners
Resource Lists for Autism & Autistic Spectrum Disorder
Need some resources on autism and autistic spectrum disorders?  Check out our list of physical and e-resources!

Autism & Autistic Spectrum Disorder Resources at the Cullom-Davis Library
Wordless Picture Books

Image source: https://goo.gl/images/nHGJMy

Wordless picture books are perfect for reluctant readers and anyone who loves a beautiful visual narrative. 
Action Reads: When You Want Story-time Up & Moving


Looking for a list of action reads that will get your little people up and moving?
 
Image source: https://classroomclipart.com/clipart/Clipart/Children.htm
 
High Interest, Low Reading Level Books
Check out these high interest, low reading level books!

High Interest, Low Reading Level
Big Books for a Massive Reading Experience


Sometimes you need to bring a BIG read into the classroom.  We've got you covered!  Check out our list of LITERALLY big storybooks that you can read to kids!

CMC Big Books List
Ellison Die Cut Press XL Machine and List of Dies


The Ellison die cut press machine is kept on the first floor in the Access Services department.  To use the machine, please ask at the Circulation Desk on the first floor of the Cullom-Davis Library.

List of Ellison Dies available for use with the Ellison Machine:
  • 4” Letters A-Z
  • 4” Numbers 1-9
  • ?
  • (!)
  • Oval
  • Square
  • Trapezoid
  • Triangle
  • Sun
  • Star
  • Rhombus
  • Rectangle
  • Circle 4” & 1”
  • Toothbrush & Tooth
  • Apple with Worm
  • Graduation cap
  • Caption boxes
  • Closed book
  • Scalloped borders
  • Star borders
Testing Kits Available in the CMC


The following testing kits are available for use in-house in the Simpson Curriculum Materials Center.  FACULTY ONLY may check out these items and remove them from the Cullom-Davis Library unless special advance permission has been obtained from the Education Librarian.  All of these items are stored upstairs in the locked grey CMC cabinets.  To access any testing kit, ask at the Curriculum Materials Center desk on the second floor or, if unstaffed, the Circulation Desk on the main floor.